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reading]

« October, 2016 »

Birds of a Feather   book icon  
by Jacqueline Winspear (2015)

read: 31 October 2016
rating: [+]
category: fiction

Second in the series. Also enjoyed it. it takes a few books in a series to figure out if you’re enjoying them since there’s a lot of exposition that takes place trying to fill you in on what has happened in past books. Some authors are better at this than others. Winspear does pretty well.

Maisie Dobbs   book icon  
by Jacqueline Winspear (2014)

read: 30 October 2016
rating: [+]
category: fiction

Excellent, a new series I can get into which will continue my enjoyment of sort of period mysteries that aren’t too gruesome or rapey. So far liking this one.

The Seas   book icon  
by Samantha Hunt (2005)

read: 20 October 2016
rating: [+]
category: fiction

Another moody seaside story, this one with a young unreliable narrator which makes you question what is really going on. I enjoyed this a lot, though enjoyed maybe isn’t even the right word. I liked the sense of place even though we could be in Maine or in Halifax by the descriptions. A lot of mermaid talk, weird families, small isolating towns and maybe some mental illness tossed in. Good that this book was short, it might have been tougher to take had it been longer.

Miss Manners' Guide to Excruciatingly Correct Behavior   book icon  
by Judith Martin (1983)

read: 17 October 2016
rating: [+]
categories: non-fiction, reference

I read the 1983 version of this and so it has absolutely no helpful information about the internet. Which is fine since that’s the one place I seem to know what I am doing. I like the idea that very good manners is basically about putting OTHER People at ease but I don’t always know how to do that (since I am often awkward) so I enjoy getting to read about tried and true ways to get along with people. Miss Manners is frequently quite amusing on these topics and this book was gigantic and I read it slowly over several months. I hear there is an updated version.

The Woman in Cabin 10   book icon  
by Ruth Ware (2016)

read: 17 October 2016
rating: [+]
category: fiction

This was a book that was at the BnB we were staying in in the UK and I read a few pages and then had to leave it behind. I got a copy when I got back and enjoyed it. Psychological thrillers aren’t usually my thing, I get tense and stay tense throughout them, but this one was suspenseful without being super creepy and the main character (though sleep and medication-deprived) is somewhat relatable and things do eventually mostly work out. Paged through it over the course of maybe a day and a half and now I want to look up what else Ware has written.

Ammonite   book icon  
by Nicola Griffith (2002)

read: 17 October 2016
rating: [+]
category: fiction

I enjoyed this book about colonizing a new planet with a cast of characters who just happen to all be women. There is a certain kind of female scifi novel that I enjoy which has conflicts but not war and the general premise that “another wold is possible” and this is the sort of world that Griffith outlines in her novel. As someone who can get tired of the endless conflicts that seem designed primarily to move the plot along, this character-based semi-worldbuilder book was gratefully appreciated.

Mooncop   book icon  
by Tom Gauld (2016)

read: 15 October 2016
rating: [+]
category: graphic novel

Brand new graphic novel by Tom Gault that tells a somewhat lonely story of someone assigned to police the moon as people gradually move away. Short book with a lot to look at, incredibly well done.

Spanish Fever   book icon  
by Santiago Garcia (2016)

read: 14 October 2016
rating: [+]
category: graphic novel

A great collection of short vignettes by Spanish artists along with an intro contextualizing the history of Spanish comics and sequential art. I didn’t know about almost all of these artists and while some of the selected pieces didn’t really do it for me, there’s a huge range of skills and abilities on display and it was a terrific read.

Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo and Me   book icon  
by Ellen Forney (2012)

read: 9 October 2016
rating: [+]
categories: graphic novel, non-fiction

Loved this book which outlines a few years during which Ellen Forney got diagnosed with bipolar and tried to work her shit out. It’s an honest and real look at both the highs of mania but also the real lows of depression and how she worked with professionals, family and friends to try to get a grip on managing her bipolar.

House of Discarded Dreams   book icon  
by Ekaterina Sedia (2010)

read: 4 October 2016
rating: [0]
category: fiction

Should have quit while I was ahead! This book was suggested in a thread of other books I really liked so I decided to try it despite my misgivings. I don’t like a lot of magical realism and when I do it’s usually stuff like Garcia Marquez’s work which is mostly story with some magical elements tossed in. This book, after the first few very good chapters was ALL magic. I mean it was used as the jumping off point for a lot of good thinking about the nature of things, families, life, etc, but ultimately it never came back around to not-magic and I was disappointed. Might be a great book for someone else, was irritating for me.

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